close

April 11, 2017

Should we homeschool….

no thumb



I’m trying to plan for next year and i’m struggling with deciding if 2 of my children should be homeschooled. Here’s my situation. I have 7 children, one is grown up and working, one is a junior in high school, homeschooled. One is a sophomore in high school. In PS by choice. my other dd in 7th grade and currently in PS. my ds in 4th grade, my 7yo ds with severe autism in school- for everyone’s sanity, plus he’s doing really well there, and his twin who’s homeschooled. The ones in question are my 7th grade dd and my 4th grade ds. Their situations are drastically different. First my daughter. She’s delayed in both math and reading/writing. She has autism and cognitively has some issues. Right now she’s sorta sliding by in school, EXCEPT in math, in which she has an AMAZING teacher, her special ed caseworker who works with her, pretty much one on one. so she’s doing really well in math. She also LOVES choir, even though its really not a good program, she’s excellent and gets lots of practice doing solos and using a microphone, etc. But here’s the catch. Her school sucks. one of the kids last year was charged in a murder, i’m guessing there’s some gang activity, she was targeted for being white early last year, but it was well dealt with, I’m not particularly comfortable with her being there and we are going to for sure be homeschooling Leif, her brother, that I’ll be talking about next, during that middle school time. Her school is undergoing a change, which the teachers i’ve spoken with both choir and math are not optimistic, but the lady from the sup’s office insists will be better, include sharing a building with the TAF program, which is a stem school and Saghalie, the middle school, is moving in a stem direction. As of now, there’s no art, social studies, or clubs. Next year the sup’s person insists there WILL be clubs, art and possibly choir which looks now to be replaced with "electronic music" Sigh…. my concern is the VOLUME of work that they do at school. No way could i pull that off. Homeschooling with mean less work, but possibly more work done well. (by the way, having her at school for just math isn’t an option because of transportation) we also have access to a really good math tutor who’s working with my 18yo. So i’m trying to decide if i can justify homeschooling her. Next is my 10yo ds. He’s ADHD and on meds, which we started after i decided to put him in school 2 years ago. i reached a breaking point with him and his temper, and he’s now on mood meds and adhd meds, so i think it might work better this time. He’s doing well in school except that he’s rather bored. He’s gifted and functions at about a 7th grade level in both reading and math and funds were cut for the gifted program, and while he’s supposed to be with a teacher that works well with gifted kids, even she’s limited by the constraints of school. I dont want him to lose the love of learning that he totally is, and i want him to not be wasting his time, but again, realistically, homeschooling 4, we are going to not have the volume of lessons that he would get in school. I’m really self conscious about that if you didn’t notice. Anyway… i’m trying to decide if i’d be doing them a disservice by hsing them. Thank you if you’ve gotten this far! i’d love any insight that you might have!!





Source link

read more

Here's how much airlines will pay you to give up your seat


Passenger rights on overbooked flights

How much will an airline pay you to give up your seat? The answer: As much as you can negotiate for.

By law, the airlines do not have to pay more than 400% of the value of the ticket, up to $1,350, when they bump someone off a flight against their will.

‘;
for (i = 0; i 4) {
afterParagraphFour = true;
}
currentParagraph = storytext.childNodes[i];
heights += currentParagraph.clientHeight;
if (heights >= limit && insertAfterThisParagraphIndex === -1) {
insertAfterThisParagraphIndex = SMARTASSET.setDivIndex(i);
console.log(“insert after paragraph number ” + i);
console.log(“HEIGHTS = ” + heights);
console.log(“LIMIT = ” + limit);
}
}
/* div with id=”ie_column” */
else if (storytext.childNodes[i].nodeName.toLowerCase() === ‘div’ &&
storytext.childNodes[i].id !== “undefined” &&
storytext.childNodes[i].id ===”ie_column”) {
heights = 0;
limit = 80;
insertAfterThisParagraphIndex = -1
}
/* embeds from twitter, facebook, youtube */
else if (storytext.childNodes[i].nodeName.toLowerCase() === ‘div’ &&
storytext.childNodes[i].classList.contains(’embed’)) {
heights = 0;
limit = 80;
insertAfterThisParagraphIndex = -1
}
/* cnn video player */
else if (storytext.childNodes[i].nodeName.toLowerCase() === ‘div’ &&
storytext.childNodes[i].classList.contains(‘cnnplayer’)) {
heights = 0;
limit = 80;
insertAfterThisParagraphIndex = -1
}
/* images */
else if (storytext.childNodes[i].nodeName.toLowerCase() === ‘img’) {
heights = 0;
limit = 80;
}
/* images stored in figure tags */
else if (storytext.childNodes[i].nodeName.toLowerCase() === ‘figure’) {
heights = 0;
limit = 80;
}
}
if (heights >= 875 && afterParagraphFour) {
storytext.childNodes[insertAfterThisParagraphIndex].insertAdjacentHTML(‘afterend’, smartAssetDiv);
smartasset = document.getElementById(‘smartasset-article’);
smartasset.style.float = ‘left’; // allows module to have text float to right
smartasset.style.marginRight =’20px’;
smartasset.style.marginBottom =’25px’;
}
}

SMARTASSET.setSmartAssetScript = function() {
console.log(‘starting setSmartAssetScript’);
SA = document.SA || [];
SA.push({
embedUrl: “https://smartasset.com”,
container: “#smartasset-article”,
version: 1.1,
data:
{ key: “bdknf2rinbhwvdksm6zbmhf3twrv4oih” }
/*{ key: “CNNe038d38a57032085441e7fe7010b0” }*/
});
console.log(‘finished in setSmartAssetScript push() call’);

var smscript = document.createElement(“script”);
smscript.type = “text/javascript”;
smscript.async = true;
smscript.src = (“https:” == document.location.protocol ? “https://” : “http://”) + “smartasset.com/embed.js”;

var s = document.getElementsByTagName(“script”)[0];
s.parentNode.insertBefore(smscript, s);
console.log(“finished entire function of setSmartAssetFunction()”);
};
SMARTASSET.setSmartAssetDiv();
SMARTASSET.setSmartAssetScript();

But airlines occasionally offer more than that to find a volunteer.

United Airlines says it offered $1,000 to a passenger on Sunday before he was dragged off a plane, screaming and bleeding, to make room for a commuting crew member who needed a seat. Other passengers say the compensation offer stopped at $800.

Since then, of course, United has taken a costly public relations hit. And its stock lost $250 million in value on Tuesday. After two days of growing outrage and two statements that only seemed to make things worse, United CEO Oscar Munoz finally apologized on Tuesday and called the episode “truly horrific.”

United declined to explain why it didn’t offer more, or talk about its guidelines for negotiating with passengers. The airline said that would be part of its review of what went wrong in Chicago.

Related United CEO apologizes for “truly horrific” passenger incident

family gives up airline seats
Laura Begley Bloom and her family negotiated for a total of $11,000 from Delta to give up their seats.

Laura Begley Bloom and her family had a better experience last week. Delta paid them $11,000 not to fly.

Begley Bloom, her husband and her 4-year-old daughter had tickets to fly from New York to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on Friday. It was the third day of the Delta weather debacle, and thousands of unhappy passengers needed to be rebooked.

So Delta was offering top dollar to anyone who would agree to give up a seat.

When the gate agent offered $900, Begley Bloom’s husband offered their three seats for $1,500 each. The agent counted with an offer of $1,350 apiece — so the family left the airport with $4,050 in vouchers and a promise that they would be put on a flight on Saturday.

Two of them were feeling pretty good about things.

“I’m not going to lie to you, my daughter cried. She was upset not to see her grandparents and cousins,” Begley Bloom, a travel editor who now runs a consulting business, told CNNMoney.

“But we weren’t sure that flight was ever going to leave,” she said. “There were people who were at the gate who had been sleeping on the floor for days, yelling and cursing. We just wanted to get her away from there.”

Related: Buckle your seat belt. You’re stuck with your airline

When the family returned to the airport on Saturday, they found the flight overbooked once again, and gate agents looking for more volunteers. They left with $3,950 more and a promise that they would be put on a flight on Sunday.

But the third day was no better. They agreed to have their tickets refunded and accept an additional $1,000 per ticket.

“I’ve been a travel editor for 25 years,” Begley Bloom said. “I’ve been on plenty of flights where they asked for volunteers. I’ve never done it.”

What gate agents are willing to offer depends more on the situation than on the airline, said Robert Mann, the head of airline consulting firm R.W. Mann & Company. It boils down to “how badly they need volunteers” and how willing customers are to accept other flights, he said.

Brett Snyder, a former airline executive and editor of the travel blog Crankyflier.com, said it’s rare for airlines to offer more than $1,350 for a voluntary seat surrender, but he’s heard of it happening.

“Sometimes you’re just desperate to find the passengers who agree to be bumped, like United should have been,” Snyder said. “It would have saved them a lot of money if they had offered more.”

–CNNMoney’s Julia Horowitz and Jon Ostrower contributed to this report.

CNNMoney (New York) First published April 11, 2017: 6:19 PM ET


Terms & Conditions apply

NMLS #1136




Source link

read more

The Rock Confirms He Can Move A Torpedo With His Bare Hand

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video;a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); A “Fate of the Furious” mystery has finally been solved, and what can The Rock say except, “You’re
read more
1 2 3 13
Page 1 of 13