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Photography tips and tricks by Phillip Haumesser


What a difference a change in perspective can make.

It’s something Missouri-based photographer Phillip Haumesser hopes to prove with his ‘before and after’ gallery of family snaps, illustrating how even drab locations can be dressed up with the right tricks.

Mr Haumesser only started teaching himself the art of natural light photography in 2015, largely by watching videos on YouTube, and has evidently come along in leaps and bounds.

Missouri-based photographer Phillip Haumesser has released a before (pictured) and after gallery of family snaps
They illustrate how even drab locations can be dressed up with a change in perspective

Missouri-based photographer Phillip Haumesser has released a before (left) and after (right) gallery of family snaps, illustrating how even drab locations can be dressed up with a change in perspective

Speaking to MailOnline, Mr Haumesser said: ‘You want to be at eye-level with or below your subject.

‘Also, I used the rule of thirds – you don’t want to centre your subject in the shot, you position them to one side. It makes for a much more interesting photo.’

He goes on: ‘I used a lens with a wide aperture, which is what creates the blurry background and foreground.

‘I wanted to prove that this can be done with cheap equipment, so I only spent $30 on the lens and I borrowed an old camera from my brother.’ 

Mr Haumesser only started teaching himself the art of natural light photography in 2015
He did this largely by watching videos on YouTube, and has evidently come along in leaps and bounds

Mr Haumesser only started teaching himself the art of natural light photography in 2015, largely by watching videos on YouTube, and has evidently come along in leaps and bounds

Speaking to MailOnline, Mr Haumesser said: 'You want to be at eye-level with or below your subject, rather than above'
... a tip clearly illustrated here

Speaking to MailOnline, Mr Haumesser said: ‘You want to be at eye-level with or below your subject, rather than above’

He adds: 'Also, I used the rule of thirds - you don't want to centre your subject in the shot, you position them to one side'
It makes for a much more interesting photo, he says

He adds: ‘Also, I used the rule of thirds – you don’t want to centre your subject in the shot, you position them to one side. It makes for a much more interesting photo’ 

He also said that one of the most helpful things he learned was setting his camera to manual mode.

‘I’m a control freak and I didn’t like the idea of some algorithm deciding how my photo was going to look and forced myself to learn it,’ he said. 

‘Then I turned to YouTube, I’m a visual learner so the videos were incredibly helpful. 

‘I started watching everything I could find on photography and eventually found Flearn, their videos were the most helpful when it came to learning Photoshop.’  

This allows for a lot more creative freedom

He also said that one of the most helpful things he learned was setting his camera to manual mode 

On when his hobby first developed, he explains: 'I started to notice how light affected things, and how looking at something from a different perspective could change the whole scene'
'I used a lens with a wide aperture, which is what creates the blurry background and foreground,' he explains

‘I used a lens with a wide aperture, which is what creates the blurry background and foreground,’ he explains

'I wanted to prove that this can be done with cheap equipment, so I only spent $30 on the lens and I borrowed an old camera from my brother,' he said of his 'after' shots
Mr Haumesser has created a free online photography course for anyone who wants to give it a shot, even with a cheap camera and cheap lens

‘I wanted to prove that this can be done with cheap equipment, so I only spent $30 on the lens and I borrowed an old camera from my brother,’ he says

The lighting here appears far from ideal
Here, he's got closer to his children in the second shot and angled the frame so that the sunlight catches them in a better way

Here, he’s got closer to his children in the second shot (right) and angled the frame so that the sunlight catches them in a different way

This photo is too dark
Again, here he's found a position from which the sunlight pokes through the cracks in the walls, and he's taken the shot from ground level, rather than from above

Again, he’s found a position from which the sunlight pokes through the cracks in the walls (right), and he’s taken the shot from ground level, rather than from above (left)

Writing for Bored Panda about when his hobby first developed, he explains: ‘I started to notice how light affected things, and how looking at something from a different perspective could change the whole scene.’

‘I want everyone to have this same experience. So I created a free photography course for anyone who wants to give it a shot. I show you how you can do this with a cheap camera and cheap lens. 

‘I’ve even used my cell phone when I didn’t have my camera with me.’

You can find out more about Mr Haumesser’s work on his Facebook page.  

 



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