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Comedy duo Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy collectables are set to rise in value


CASH IN THE ATTIC: Comedy duo Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy collectables are set to rise in value

Jeff Prestridge for The Mail on Sunday

Every week TOBY WALNE gives the low-down on the value of forgotten treasures that may be gathering dust in your attic.

Collectables related to comedy duo Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy are set to rise in value following the recent release of film Stan & Ollie.

Autographs are relatively commonplace as the actors personally replied to fan mail, but a signed photo of them still sells for more than £500.

Collectables related to comedy duo Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy are set to rise in value following the recent release of film Stan & Ollie

Collectables related to comedy duo Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy are set to rise in value following the recent release of film Stan & Ollie

Collectables related to comedy duo Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy are set to rise in value following the recent release of film Stan & Ollie

Movie posters of the legendary comedians are also highly sought after. An original poster promoting their 1933 hit film Sons Of The Desert, featuring the couple wearing fezes rather than usual bowler hats, now sells for more than £5,000.

Memorabilia toys are also popular as few have survived. 

A pair of wind-up, eight-inch figures produced by Hertwig and Co from the late-1920s sold for £3,600 in 2008 – but today would fetch a much higher price.

Props are rare so they are even more valuable. A bowler hat worn by Cumbria-born Stan in their 1930s films sold for £26,250 at auction eight years ago.

A 1918 Ford Model T driven in their early short comedy sketch films sold for $43,000 (£33,000) in 2011.

 

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Business World

BAILLE GIFFORD JAPAN: A trust that aims to grow savers’ money over the long term


BAILLE GIFFORD JAPAN: A trust that aims to grow savers’ money over the long term

City & Finance Reporter for the Daily Mail

The Japan Trust from Scottish fund manager Baillie Gifford aims to grow savers' money over the long term

The Japan Trust from Scottish fund manager Baillie Gifford aims to grow savers' money over the long term

The Japan Trust from Scottish fund manager Baillie Gifford aims to grow savers’ money over the long term

What does it do? The Japan Trust from Scottish fund manager Baillie Gifford aims to grow savers’ money over the long term, rather than focusing on giving them an income. 

It primarily buys shares in small and medium Japanese firms, which are thought to have above-average growth prospects.

What does the manager invest in? Japanese investment giant Softbank is the trust’s largest holding, while electricals firm Sony also appears in the top ten.

What do the experts like? Juliet Schooling Latter, of Fundcalibre, says: ‘The trust has always been reasonably priced relative to peers, but from January 1 this year the fees have been further reduced.’ 

Low fees aren’t the only draw. Japanese companies have historically offered ‘exceptional growth opportunities with sustainable business models and strong competitive advantages’.

Any downsides? The focus on smaller companies can cause some volatility in the fund’s performance, Schooling Latter says, and its use of debt to help it buy more shares means that gains are amplified, but so is bad performance. 

The trust is at the higher end of the risk spectrum, so won’t be suitable for all investors.

 

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