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Biden defends remarks about segregationist senators: ‘Apologize for what?’


Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFive takeaways from Trump’s 2020 kickoff rally Five takeaways from Trump’s 2020 kickoff rally Sanders tears into Trump in response to campaign kickoff rally MORE on Wednesday dismissed calls to apologize for invoking his working relationships with two segregationist senators as an example of “civility,” saying that his Democratic colleagues knew better. 

Asked by a reporter whether he’d apologize for his Tuesday remarks, the Democratic presidential candidate responded, “Apologize for what?”

“He knows better,” Biden added, referencing Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerWarren introduces universal child care legislation Warren introduces universal child care legislation Booker responds to Trump’s mass deportation threat: ‘This is not who we are’ MORE‘s (D-N.J.) call to apologize for the remarks. “There’s not a racist bone in my body. I’ve been involved in civil rights my whole career. Period. Period. Period.”

Biden has faced mounting backlash in the past 24 hours after invoking former Sens. James Eastland (D-Miss.) and Herman Talmadge (D-Ga.) during a speech at a fundraiser Tuesday night.

Among other things, the 2020 Democratic presidential candidate cited his ability to work with the segregationist senators as an example of “civility” that no longer exists in Congress.

Biden also reminisced about working with Eastland and Talmadge in the Senate, saying Eastland never called him “boy.”

“At least there was some civility. We got things done. We didn’t agree on much of anything. We got things done. We got it finished,” Biden said.

2020 Democratic candidates such as Booker, who is black, and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersFive takeaways from Trump’s 2020 kickoff rally Five takeaways from Trump’s 2020 kickoff rally Sanders tears into Trump in response to campaign kickoff rally MORE (I-Vt.) demanded Biden apologize for the comment. 

“You don’t joke about calling black men ‘boys,’” Booker said in a statement. “Men like James O. Eastland used words like that, and the racist policies that accompanied them, to perpetuate white supremacy and strip black Americans of our very humanity.

“I have to tell Vice President Biden, as someone I respect, that he is wrong for using his relationships with Eastland and Talmadge as examples of how to bring our country together. And frankly, I’m disappointed that he hasn’t issued an immediate apology for the pain his words are dredging up for many Americans. He should.”

Sanders added that Biden’s comments were particularly damaging “at a time when the Trump administration is trying to divide us up with its racist appeals.” Other 2020 candidates, including Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBiden, Sanders to be center stage at first debate Biden, Sanders to be center stage at first debate Poll: Six Dems lead Trump in Florida match-ups MORE (D-Calif.), who is black, and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSanders tears into Trump in response to campaign kickoff rally Sanders tears into Trump in response to campaign kickoff rally Warren introduces universal child care legislation MORE (D-Mass.) condemned Biden’s position. 

Biden stressed that he intended to make the point that “you don’t have to agree” in order to pass major legislation. 

“Here’s the deal. I could not have disagreed with them more. I ran for the United States Senate because I disagreed with the views of the segregationists,” Biden said, adding that many of them were in the Senate when he first joined the body. 

He went on to say that, despite those major differences, the Senate was able to pass an extension to the 1965 Voting Rights Act. 

“You don’t have to like the people in terms of their views,” Biden said. “But you just simply make the case and you beat them. You beat them, without changing the system.”

Biden’s campaign has pushed back fiercely against the criticism he’s received from 2020 presidential candidates. 

“[Biden] did not praise a segregationist. That is a disingenuous take. He basically said sometimes in Congress, one has to work with terrible or down right racist folks to get things done. And then went on to say when you can’t work with them, work around them,” Symone SandersSymone SandersOvernight Health Care: Biden camp defends amid Hyde backlash | Ebola outbreak may last 2 years | Feds target vaping companies over social media ‘influencers’ Overnight Health Care: Biden camp defends amid Hyde backlash | Ebola outbreak may last 2 years | Feds target vaping companies over social media ‘influencers’ Biden adviser pushes back against Hyde reversal criticism: ‘He’s authentic’ MORE, a senior advisor for the Biden campaign, tweeted.

UPDATED 8:49 p.m.





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Trump Administration Can’t Block Immigrant Teens From Getting Abortions, Court Rules



(Reuters) – A U.S. appeals court ruled on Friday that the U.S. government cannot deny access to abortions for unaccompanied immigrant minors in federal custody, delivering a blow to a Trump administration policy.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld a lower court decision that found the government cannot unduly burden the ability of a woman to obtain an abortion under established Supreme Court precedent.

The case involves the intersection of two divisive social issues on which Republican President Donald Trump has taken a hard line: abortion and immigration.

It began with a 17-year-old girl, whose name and nationality were not disclosed and was called “Jane Doe” in legal papers. She came to the United States alone in 2017 and was placed in the care of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, which falls under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and houses immigrant children.

The girl, who was in the United States illegally, obtained an abortion after suing the administration in federal court. But the Supreme Court last year allowed the litigation to continue in lower courts to determine the fate of other detained immigrants in similar situations.

The Office of Refugee Resettlement in March 2017 announced that shelters were “prohibited from taking any action that facilitates an abortion without direction and approval from the Director.” Scott Lloyd, who had become the agency’s director that month, then denied every abortion request presented to him during his tenure even when the pregnancy resulted from rape, according to the appeals court ruling. Lloyd left his post at the end of 2018.

“The policy functions as an across-the-board ban on access to abortion,” the appeals court ruling said.

The U.S. Justice Department declined to comment.

In the 2018 fiscal year, there were almost 50,000 unaccompanied minors referred to the refugee office’s network of some 100 shelters around the United States.

Minors from countries other than Mexico or Canada who cross the border alone stay in federal care until they can be released to sponsors in the United States or until they turn 18 and are transferred to immigration detention. In fiscal year 2017, the only year for which data is available, 18 pregnant unaccompanied minors in the refugee office’s custody requested abortions, according to the court ruling.

The Trump administration could appeal the ruling to the Supreme Court but Justice Brett Kavanaugh, a conservative Trump appointee who participated in the case when he served on the D.C. Circuit, would likely be recused. That would leave the court split 4-4 along ideological grounds.





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